fastcompany
fastcompany:

No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.
In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?
One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:
Read More>

fastcompany:

No one wants their private emails or pictures out there for the world to see. Here’s how to make them more secure.

In light of some disconcerting news recently involving cyber creeps picking through our private accounts, this Friday we’re offering you a hack that will not only make your accounts a little more secure, but hopefully will put your minds somewhat at ease. Should we call this edition the no-hack hack?

One of the best ways to step up your online security is by activating two-step authentication on your private accounts. Both Google and iCloud make this process available, and although many begrudge the onus placed on customers to be proactive about their security, making this kind of security a default is still a thing of the future, so it’s up to us as consumers to take an active role in our privacy. Here’s how to get started:

Read More>

fastcompany
fastcompany:

Fast Company’s “Letter From The Editor,” June 2007 "We’ve just moved to 7 World Trade Center, a site destroyed on 9/11 and rebuilt as one of the first gold-level green-certified office buildings in New York. We overlook the Hudson River and Wall Street— and the pit where the Twin Towers once stood. I can see their footprint from my desk. This is my first letter to readers as editor of this magazine, and my second issue. I didn’t choose our new site, but I’m proud of it, proud of our owner and our CEO for having the faith and the foresight to embrace this venue as one of possibility in the wake of tragedy. Not everyone is thrilled about the real estate we now occupy. My wife was anxious when I first told her about our new address, reminded of that terrible day in 2001. Some staffers at our company chose not to move with us; the memories were too harsh. But I feel differently. For a magazine like Fast Company, there is no more fitting location for our headquarters: a place that is all about rebirth and potential and the promise of tomorrow.” — Robert Safian, Editor (Photo by iamrobbiejones)

fastcompany:

Fast Company’s “Letter From The Editor,” June 2007

"We’ve just moved to 7 World Trade Center, a site destroyed on 9/11 and rebuilt as one of the first gold-level green-certified office buildings in New York. We overlook the Hudson River and Wall Street— and the pit where the Twin Towers once stood. I can see their footprint from my desk.

This is my first letter to readers as editor of this magazine, and my second issue. I didn’t choose our new site, but I’m proud of it, proud of our owner and our CEO for having the faith and the foresight to embrace this venue as one of possibility in the wake of tragedy. Not everyone is thrilled about the real estate we now occupy. My wife was anxious when I first told her about our new address, reminded of that terrible day in 2001. Some staffers at our company chose not to move with us; the memories were too harsh. But I feel differently. For a magazine like Fast Company, there is no more fitting location for our headquarters: a place that is all about rebirth and potential and the promise of tomorrow.” — Robert Safian, Editor (Photo by iamrobbiejones
)

latimes
A thunderstorm Monday night had cleared the air over Manhattan and the sunlight of a warm September morning was glinting off the Hudson River as the business day began in the city’s highest buildings.
A description of the conditions in New York on Sept. 11, 2001, before the planes struck the World Trade Center. From our Sept. 12, 2001, story that we pulled from the archives on the 13th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. (via latimes)
brooklynmutt

brooklynmutt:

Mike Piazza’s memorable HR, Sept. 21, 2001

(First MLB game played in NYC after 9/11)